When Should I Worry About a Home Inspection Report?

When_Should_I_Worry_About_a_Home_Inspection_Report[1]

Finding the right home can be emotionally draining, especially in a competitive market. Just when you think you have found the perfect place, the property is either too expensive or priced so that you end up in a bidding war. When you finally find something workable and get an offer accepted, the last thing you want to see is a negative home inspection report. However, even when a report may seem alarming on its face, there may or may not be a major defect with the property. If you are buying a home, you need to know: When should I worry about a home inspection report?

Your Arizona Home Inspection

In Arizona, a buyer has a specific amount of time after a seller accepts the offer to have the property inspected. The buyer will hire an inspector who has been certified by the Arizona Board of Technical Registration (BTR) to perform a limited visual evaluation of the mechanical elements and structure of the dwelling.  Inspectors look for problems such as termite and roof damage, leaking pipes, foundation, wall valves, gutters, heating, and AC units, broken appliances, and rotted siding. Your home inspection is not going to extend to matters such as toxic mold or other non-visible conditions. However, if you want someone to check for those issues, you can hire specialized professionals to look at the property.

The Inspection Report

An inspector will provide you with a written report of his or her findings that will include a detailed analysis of the property’s condition on the date of the inspection. Many reports will include photographs with a narrative explanation of the inspector’s observations. However, some inspectors may use a checklist-style report.

To a layperson who is unfamiliar with these types of documents, this may appear to be a laundry list of major problems. Inspection reports can be extraordinarily detailed. However, the explanations about a property may be lengthy and not include any material defects. The inspectors are trained to be thorough and provide a comprehensive analysis. Seeing all their work written out can be intimidating. However, it does not necessarily mean that there are material defects in your prospective home.

Review the Inspection Report with Your Real Estate Professionals

 When you get your inspection report, consult with your Arizona real estate professional so that he or she can offer insight as to what the inspector has indicated. Once you have a better understanding of the conclusions, you can work together to decide what your next steps should be concerning the contract.

Laura B. Bramnick is an experienced Arizona real estate attorney who has the expertise you need at every stage of your real estate transaction.  If you are seeking an exceptional, client-driven real estate lawyer in Scottsdale, Phoenix, Sedona, and throughout the state of Arizona, contact Laura B. Bramnick to schedule your consultation.

 

 

 

 

 

Previous Post
Understanding Your Arizona Real Estate Purchase Contract
Next Post
5 Reasons the Arizona Vacation Rental Market Remains Strong
Menu